Archive | January 2013

African Communalism versus Western Individualism: A false dichotomy

This post is the personal opinion of the author and may not reflect the views of the Humanist Association of Ghana.

Professor Osei’s presentation at the International Humanist Conference in Accra, 2012 entitled The Relevance of Secular Humanism to the Contemporary African Society asserted that the Western construct of Humanism is bringing excessive individualism to Africa in opposition to its traditional values of communalism. Professor Osei also said we need to think about the issue of LGBT rights within this context.

To find a distinctly African expression of humanism sounds like an attractive project, yet the assertion has also been bothering me. I have been pondering on these issues since that presentation and hope I may have found a resolution to the apparent conflict. Read More…

Advertisements

Reality, Anxiety and False Idols

In Ghana, it is common to hear the phrase, “We’re suffering oo”. It’s almost undoubtedly caused by the realities of living but also by a perception that life is better outside the country.

Like people all over the world, we believe that if only there was more money, a better government, or if we owned more ‘stuff’, that we’d experience a sense of completeness and suffering would be alleviated. Read More…

Report from the International Humanist Conference, Accra, 2012

Over 55 people attended Ghana’s first ever international humanist conference at the SNITT Guesthouse, Accra, including participants from Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia and the Netherlands.

It was organised by the Humanist Association of Ghana (HAG) and the International Humanist and Ethical Youth Organisation (IHEYO), who sponsored the event.

After opening addresses from Gea Meijers (IHEYO) and Daniel Addae (HAG), Leo Igwe delivered his presentation on The Necessity of Humanism in Africa – Leo drawing on his experience as ex-President of the Nigerian Humanist Movement and his anti-witchcraft campaigns. He noted that it is not the socio-economic conditions in Africa that make humanism impossible, but it is those conditions that make it necessary. Read More…